[2] You Know What They Say…

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14 Comments

  1. S. Hansen

    I’m not nearly so familiar with the origins of this saying. But I believe it had something to with the tide of the Thames back when the European royals were giving each other exotic animals as “presents”.
    The annoyance of having to tend for an animal outside of their natural habitat made them the backhanded compliment of the gift world.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mindfump

      I believe you’re right, but I also heard it may have come from the evolution of the giraffe when all other animals were fighting over food at low tide, the giraffe DECIDED to grow a long neck and wait for high tide. Smart.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. S. Hansen

        It is pretty smart evolution. A wise decision on the part of the giraffe. I don’t know why owls have a reputation for being wise, they can only turn their head lots, giraffes reach all the food nothing else can. That’s smart.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Paul Sunstone

    I quite certain that the quote, in its current form (which you have cited here) dates back to the 1950s and the pioneering work of W. T. Stace, who stated it in a footnote of his three volume work, “Mystical Unionization: A History of the Guru Labor Movement in India”. Chicago: Aburrido Books (1953). Print.

    However, it’s my understanding that it is widely known among scholars that earlier formulations of the now popular saying date back, as S. Hansen correctly observed, to the 1560s, and the British royals.

    Cheers to you for posting such an inspiring quote!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mindfump

      I’m so glad to have such knowledge readers, the work of W.T. Stace has been overlooked for far too long. I also love any publications from the Aburrido book publishers. Without you guys this blog would be obsolete. A real foundation of knowledge.

      Like

  3. Paul Sunstone

    By the way, while we’re at it, do any of you good folks happen to know who originated, “Go among the flowers of life as if you were breastfed but not crestfallen, crumpled but not trampled, and make every day to you as sacred as a fast”? I can’t for the life of me find the author!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mindfump

      This one originated in Lower Belgium during the 1920s with numerous sources cited but it came about because of the over reliance on breast milk substitute. The breast milk substitute imported from neighbouring Netherlands which is known for its beautiful flowers. The idea of the first part is that you should experience the beauty of the flowers for being flowers. Basically meaning be yourself. Like you for you, don’t substitute. A crumpled flower signifies the start of spring and the birth of a flower, a trampled flower is no good to anyone. Finally fasting is known to reduce the risk of heart disease in white European men, so I think it was just a health awareness notice. Inspire and improve knowledge of general health with advice. A great quote, personal favourite of mine.

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  4. Yoshiko

    Hey there, I think your blog might be having browser compatibility issues. When I look at your blog site in Firefox, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has some overlapping. I just wanted to give you a quick heads up! Other then that, terrific blog!

    Like

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